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GardeningPlantsJuly 14, 2023by Colin0A Dozen Crops to Plant in August

#1Carrots

  1. Prepare the soil: Choose a well-drained location for growing carrots. Remove any debris, rocks, or clumps from the soil. Loosen the soil to a depth of at least 12 inches to ensure good root penetration.
  2. Sow the seeds: Carrot seeds are small, so handle them with care. Sow the seeds directly into the ground, spacing them according to the recommended distance for the variety (typically 1-2 inches apart). Plant the seeds about ¼ to ½ inch deep in the soil.
  3. Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil gently to keep it consistently moist. Avoid overwatering, as excessive moisture can lead to rotting. Maintain adequate moisture throughout the germination and growing process.
  4. Thinning: Once the carrot seedlings reach about 2-3 inches in height, thin them out to provide enough space for the roots to develop properly. Thin the seedlings to about 2-4 inches apart.
  5. Mulch and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as straw or wood chips, around the carrot plants. This helps retain moisture in the soil, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weed growth. Keep the area around the carrots free from weeds to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  6. Fertilization: Carrots generally don’t require heavy fertilization. However, you can side-dress the plants with a balanced organic fertilizer once or twice during their growth period to provide additional nutrients.
  7. Pest control: Watch out for pests such as carrot flies or aphids. Utilize organic pest control methods, including floating row covers or companion planting, to protect the plants.
  8. Harvesting: Carrots typically take 60-80 days to mature, depending on the variety. Harvest them when they have reached the desired size and color. Gently loosen the soil around the carrots before pulling them out to avoid breakage.
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#2Lettuce

  1. Choose a suitable location for growing lettuce that receives partial shade to full sun. Ensure the soil is well-drained and rich in organic matter.
  2. Directly sow lettuce seeds into the ground in August. Prepare the soil by removing any weeds or debris and loosening it to a depth of at least 6 inches.
  3. Sow the lettuce seeds about ¼ to ½ inch deep and space them according to the specific variety’s recommended spacing. Typically, lettuce plants should be spaced around 6-12 inches apart in rows.
  4. Cover the seeds with soil and gently firm it down. Water the soil lightly after planting to ensure good seed-to-soil contact.
  5. Keep the soil consistently moist during germination and throughout the growing season. Regular watering is important, especially during dry spells, to prevent the lettuce from becoming bitter or bolting prematurely.
  6. Apply a layer of mulch around the lettuce plants to help retain moisture in the soil, suppress weed growth, and maintain even soil temperature.
  7. Monitor the plants for pests such as slugs, snails, or aphids. Employ appropriate organic pest control methods if needed.
  8. Harvest lettuce leaves when they reach the desired size, typically when they are young and tender. You can either pick individual outer leaves or cut the entire plant at the base for a larger harvest.
  9. Consider succession planting by sowing small batches of lettuce seeds every few weeks to ensure a continuous harvest throughout the season.
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#3Spinach

  1. Select a suitable location for planting spinach that receives partial shade to full sun. Ensure the soil is well-drained and rich in organic matter.
  2. Directly sow spinach seeds into the ground in August. Prepare the soil by removing any weeds or debris and loosening it to a depth of at least 6 inches.
  3. Sow the spinach seeds about ½ inch deep and space them around 2-4 inches apart in rows. Cover the seeds with soil and gently firm it down.
  4. Keep the soil consistently moist during germination and throughout the growing season. Regular watering is crucial, especially during dry periods.
  5. As the spinach seedlings emerge, thin them to allow enough space for proper growth. Aim for a final spacing of around 6-8 inches between plants.
  6. Mulch around the spinach plants to help retain soil moisture, suppress weeds, and maintain an even temperature.
  7. Monitor the plants for pests such as aphids or leaf miners. Apply appropriate organic pest control measures if necessary.
  8. Spinach is a cool-season crop, so it’s important to keep it from excessive heat. Consider providing shade or using row covers to protect the plants during hot spells.
  9. Harvest spinach leaves when they reach the desired size. You can either pick individual outer leaves or cut the entire plant at the base. Harvesting young leaves promotes continuous growth.
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#4Broccoli

  1. Start by selecting broccoli transplants from a reputable nursery or grow your own from seeds indoors. August is a good time to sow seeds for transplanting later.
  2. Prepare the planting area by ensuring it receives full sun and has well-drained soil. Broccoli prefers fertile soil with a pH level between 6.0 and 7.5. Amend the soil with organic matter, such as compost, to improve its quality.
  3. If growing from seeds, start them indoors in seed trays or small pots about 6-8 weeks before the expected transplanting date. Keep the soil consistently moist and provide sufficient light for germination.
  4. Once the seedlings have grown to a suitable size, usually 4-6 inches tall with a few true leaves, transplant them into the garden. Space the plants approximately 18-24 inches apart to allow room for their heads to develop.
  5. Water the transplants immediately after planting and ensure they receive regular watering throughout their growth period. Consistently moist soil is essential for healthy broccoli development.
  6. Apply a layer of mulch around the plants to help conserve moisture and control weed growth.
  7. Monitor the broccoli plants for pests such as cabbage worms or aphids. If detected, employ organic pest control methods or consider using insecticides specifically labeled for use on broccoli.
  8. As the broccoli heads begin to develop, provide additional nutrients by side-dressing with compost or a balanced fertilizer according to package instructions.
  9. Harvest the broccoli heads when they are firm and compact, before they start to flower. Cut the central head with a sharp knife, leaving the plant intact to produce smaller side shoots for continued harvest.
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#5Cabbage

  1. Start cabbage seeds indoors in early August for later transplanting. Use seed trays or pots filled with a quality seed-starting mix. Maintain a temperature of around 70°F (21°C) and provide adequate light for germination.
  2. Transplant the cabbage seedlings into the garden when they have developed a few true leaves and are about 4-6 inches tall. Choose a sunny location with well-drained soil.
  3. Space the cabbage plants 12-24 inches apart, depending on the variety, to allow enough room for the heads to form. Ensure the soil is consistently moist, watering deeply when needed.
  4. Apply mulch around the plants to help conserve moisture, suppress weeds, and maintain even soil temperature.
  5. Monitor the cabbage plants for pests like cabbage worms or aphids. Use organic pest control methods or insecticides if necessary.
  6. Cabbage typically takes 60-90 days from transplanting to harvest, depending on the variety. Harvest the heads when they are firm and reach the desired size, cutting them off at the base.
  7. If there’s a risk of frost in your area, you can protect the cabbage plants with row covers or bring them indoors. Additionally, selecting varieties that have good cold tolerance can extend the growing season.
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#6Brussels Sprouts

  1. Start Brussels sprouts seeds indoors in August for transplanting later in the month. Use seed starting trays or pots filled with a quality seed-starting mix.
  2. Ensure the seeds receive sufficient warmth and light for germination. Maintain a temperature of around 70°F (21°C) and provide 12-14 hours of light each day.
  3. Transplant the Brussels sprout seedlings into the garden when they have developed a few true leaves and are about 4-6 inches tall. Choose a location with full sun or partial shade and well-drained soil.
  4. Space the transplants 18-24 inches apart, leaving enough room for the Brussels sprouts to develop fully. Water the plants regularly, keeping the soil consistently moist.
  5. As the plants grow, provide support if necessary by staking them to prevent them from toppling over in strong winds. Monitor for pests, such as aphids or caterpillars, and take appropriate measures to control them.
  6. Brussels sprouts typically take 90-100 days from transplanting to harvest. Harvest the sprouts from the bottom of the stalk upwards as they reach a suitable size and firmness.
  7. If there’s a risk of frost, you can protect the plants with row covers or bring them indoors. In colder regions, consider selecting varieties with shorter maturity times for successful harvest before the onset of winter.
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#7Beets

  1. Variety selection: Choose beet varieties that are suitable for late-season planting and have a shorter maturity period. Look for varieties known for heat tolerance and faster growth.
  2. Soil preparation: Select a location with well-drained soil and full sun exposure. Beets prefer slightly acidic to neutral soil with a pH of 6.0-7.5. Amend the soil with compost or well-rotted organic matter before planting to improve fertility and drainage.
  3. Sowing the seeds: Directly sow beet seeds into the ground in August. Plant the seeds about ½ inch deep, with a spacing of around 2-3 inches between each seed. Create rows with approximately 12-18 inches of spacing between them.
  4. Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil gently to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Keep the soil consistently moist but not overly saturated throughout the germination and growing period. Avoid letting the soil dry out completely.
  5. Shade and protection: Provide some shade or partial shade to the beet plants during the hottest part of the day. This can be achieved by using shade cloth or planting them near taller crops that provide some shade. Shade helps protect the plants from excessive heat stress.
  6. Mulching and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as straw or wood chips, around the base of the beet plants to help retain moisture, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weed growth. Regularly check for weeds and remove them to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  7. Fertilization: Beets don’t typically require heavy fertilization. However, you can incorporate a balanced organic fertilizer into the soil before planting or use a side-dressing of compost during the growing season to provide additional nutrients.
  8. Pest control: Keep an eye out for common pests such as leaf miners or aphids. Utilize organic pest control methods, such as floating row covers or insecticidal soaps, if necessary.
  9. Harvesting: Beets are typically ready for harvest within 50-70 days after sowing, depending on the variety. Harvest them when they have reached the desired size, usually around 1-2 inches in diameter. Gently pull the beets out of the ground, and trim off the foliage before storing.
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#8Radishes

  1. Variety selection: Choose quick-maturing radish varieties, such as ‘Cherry Belle’ or ‘French Breakfast,’ which are better suited for growing in warmer conditions and tend to bolt less.
  2. Timing: Sow radish seeds in the cooler part of August to increase the chances of successful growth. Aim for a period with temperatures around 60-70°F (15-21°C) to avoid excessive heat stress.
  3. Soil preparation: Select a location with well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. Radishes prefer slightly acidic to neutral soil with a pH of 6.0-7.0. Amend the soil with compost or well-rotted organic matter before planting to improve fertility.
  4. Sowing the seeds: Directly sow radish seeds into the ground, planting them about ½ inch deep. Space the seeds about 1 inch apart in rows, with rows spaced 6-12 inches apart. Avoid overcrowding to allow room for the roots to develop.
  5. Watering: Keep the soil consistently moist during germination and throughout the growing season. Water the plants regularly, ensuring they receive about 1 inch of water per week. Be careful not to overwater, as it can lead to rotting or splitting of the radishes.
  6. Shade and protection: Provide some shade or partial shade to the radish plants during the hottest part of the day. This can be achieved by using shade cloth or planting them near taller crops that provide some shade.
  7. Mulching and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as straw or wood chips, around the radish plants to help conserve moisture, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weed growth. Keep the area around the plants free from weeds to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  8. Pest control: Monitor for common pests such as flea beetles or aphids. Utilize organic pest control methods, such as floating row covers or companion planting, if necessary.
  9. Harvesting: Radishes are typically ready for harvest within 20-30 days after sowing, depending on the variety. Harvest them when they reach the desired size and shape, typically when the roots are crisp and mature. Gently pull the radishes out of the ground, and trim off the foliage before storing.
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#9Parsley

  1. Variety selection: Choose a variety of parsley that suits your preferences, such as flat-leaf (Italian) parsley or curly parsley. Both varieties can be grown successfully in August.
  2. Soil preparation: Select a location with well-drained soil and full to partial sun exposure. Amend the soil with compost or organic matter to improve its fertility and drainage.
  3. Sowing the seeds: Directly sow parsley seeds into the ground in August. Plant the seeds about ¼ inch deep, with a spacing of around 6-8 inches between each seed. Create rows with approximately 12-18 inches of spacing between them.
  4. Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil gently to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Keep the soil consistently moist but not overly saturated throughout the germination and growing period.
  5. Mulching and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the parsley plants to help retain moisture, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weed growth. Regularly check for weeds and remove them to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  6. Fertilization: Parsley is not a heavy feeder, but you can incorporate a balanced organic fertilizer into the soil before planting to provide additional nutrients. Alternatively, you can side-dress with compost during the growing season.
  7. Pest control: Keep an eye out for common pests such as aphids or caterpillars. Employ organic pest control methods, such as handpicking or using insecticidal soaps, if necessary.
  8. Harvesting: Harvest parsley leaves when they have reached a usable size, typically around 70-90 days after sowing. Harvest from the outside of the plant, cutting the outer leaves near the base of the plant to encourage continuous growth.
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#10Cilantro

  1. Select the right variety: Look for slow-bolting cilantro varieties that are more tolerant of heat and tend to resist bolting for a longer period.
  2. Timing: Sow cilantro seeds in the cooler part of August when temperatures are slightly lower. Aim for a period with temperatures around 60-70°F (15-21°C) to increase the chances of successful growth.
  3. Soil preparation: Choose a location with well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. Cilantro prefers slightly acidic to neutral soil with a pH of 6.0-7.0. Amend the soil with compost or well-rotted organic matter before planting to improve fertility.
  4. Sowing the seeds: Directly sow cilantro seeds into the ground, scattering them evenly and lightly pressing them into the soil. Space the seeds about 1 inch apart and cover them with a thin layer of soil. Avoid burying the seeds too deep.
  5. Watering: Keep the soil consistently moist during germination and throughout the growing season. Water the plants regularly, ensuring they receive about 1 inch of water per week. Avoid overwatering, as cilantro can develop root rot in overly wet conditions.
  6. Sun exposure: Provide cilantro plants with partial shade or filtered sunlight during the hottest part of the day to protect them from excessive heat. This can help delay bolting and extend the growing period.
  7. Mulching and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch, such as straw or wood chips, around the cilantro plants to help conserve moisture and suppress weed growth. Keep the area around the plants free from weeds to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  8. Harvesting: Cilantro leaves can be harvested once they reach a usable size, typically around 4-6 weeks after sowing. Pick the outer leaves, starting from the bottom, or harvest the entire plant by cutting it about 1-2 inches above the soil level.
https://i0.wp.com/www.colincanhelp.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/07/cillantro.jpg?resize=640%2C640&ssl=1

#11Bush Beans

  1. Variety selection: Choose bush bean varieties that have a shorter maturity period, typically around 50-60 days, as they will have a higher chance of reaching harvest before the first frost.
  2. Soil preparation: Select a location with well-drained soil and full sun exposure. Amend the soil with compost or organic matter to improve its fertility and drainage.
  3. Sowing the seeds: Directly sow the bush bean seeds into the ground in August. Plant the seeds about 1-2 inches deep, with a spacing of around 3-4 inches between each seed. Create rows with approximately 18-24 inches of spacing between them.
  4. Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil thoroughly to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Keep the soil consistently moist but not overly saturated throughout the growing season.
  5. Mulching and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the bean plants to help retain moisture, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weed growth. Regularly check for weeds and remove them to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  6. Fertilization: Bush beans generally don’t require heavy fertilization. However, you can incorporate a balanced organic fertilizer into the soil before planting or use a side-dressing of compost during the growing season to provide additional nutrients.
  7. Pest control: Keep an eye out for common bean pests such as aphids or bean beetles. Implement organic pest control methods, such as handpicking or using insecticidal soaps, if necessary.
  8. Harvesting: Bush beans are typically ready for harvest within 50-60 days after sowing, depending on the variety. Harvest the beans when they are tender and have reached the desired size. Gently pick the beans from the plants, being careful not to damage the stems or foliage.
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#12Snap Peas

  1. Select the right variety: Choose snap pea varieties that are suitable for late-season planting. Look for varieties with a shorter maturity period, as they are more likely to reach harvest before the first frost.
  2. Prepare the soil: Select a location with well-drained soil and full sun exposure. Amend the soil with compost or well-rotted organic matter to improve its fertility and drainage.
  3. Sow the seeds: Directly sow snap pea seeds into the ground in August. Plant the seeds about 1 inch deep and space them according to the recommended distance for the variety (usually 2-3 inches apart). Create rows with about 12-18 inches of spacing between them.
  4. Watering: After sowing the seeds, water the soil thoroughly to ensure good seed-to-soil contact. Keep the soil consistently moist throughout the growing season. Avoid overwatering, as it can lead to rotting.
  5. Trellising: Snap peas are climbers, so provide support for the plants to climb. Install a trellis or set up stakes and string to help the vines grow vertically. This will keep the plants off the ground, improve air circulation, and make harvesting easier.
  6. Mulching and weed control: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the snap pea plants to help retain moisture, regulate soil temperature, and suppress weed growth. Regularly check for weeds and remove them to prevent competition for nutrients and water.
  7. Fertilization: Snap peas generally don’t require heavy fertilization. However, you can side-dress the plants with a balanced organic fertilizer about 4-6 weeks after planting to provide additional nutrients.
  8. Pest control: Monitor for common pests such as aphids or powdery mildew. Employ organic pest control methods, such as handpicking or using insecticidal soaps, if necessary.
  9. Harvesting: Snap peas are ready for harvest when the pods are plump and filled with peas. Harvest them regularly, as this promotes continuous production. Use scissors or your fingers to carefully pick the pods from the vines.
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